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were instrumental in reviving the auto industry and to see how unions have helped to build not just a straw upper-middle-class but a stronger america -- stronger middle-class but a stronger america. people and should be focused on the same pink. they should be working to make sure companies like this manufacturer is able to make more great products. that's what they should be focused on. host: distorts free press, courtesy of the newseum in washington, as this headline -- some schools are closed in the state so teachers can also protests that block today. here is the detroit news. there headline -- michigan pro-union people are protesting this law. the republican-led legislature is expected to take it up today. this legislation would bar workers from being required to pay union fees as a condition of employment even as thousands of union members plan to protest at the state capital. the story continues inside the new york times. we are getting your take on this this morning. start dialing in now. the wall street journal editorial page, they weigh in on the issue this morning. you ca
and the european union budget. the british parliament is in recess for the holidays. members return on january 7th. >> hello there. and welcome to the west minister review. our look back at the big events in parliament over the last three months. coming up in this program, the chancellor delivers the latest bleak economic view? his budget. david cameron's bench urges him to stand up to europe. >> i support absolutely. >> the ugly specter of child abuse hits the deadlines with some dramatic consequences. lord justin levisohn delivers his plan on press standards. >> we should be wary of any legislation that has the potential to infringe free speech and a free press. >> the queen sits in on a cabinet meeting at number 10. but let's begin with the subject which has dominated politics and our pockets for many months, the state of our economy. at the start of december the chancellor came to deliver his autumn statement or mini budget. it set out the latest figures for the growth, tax and benefits. among the headlines the scrapping of a planned rise in fuel tax. a 1% rise in working benefits an increase
about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did they get to right to march into eastern europe? >> they were the victors of the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any kind were allowed to
opened in the 1990 costs at a time when the russians were in the wake of the union. there was a movement to end secrecy and discussed the past. this came from the ground up, and people at the top supported it. the archives began to open in the 1990's and in some ways were extraordinarily successful. archives began to open for western scholars. i worked a lot in russia during the 1990's, and i began to have the impression one of the other reasons they were open is because russians were so preoccupied with other things they did not care. as a young american woman, how could you beat walking around those archives? the idea was, she wants to look at those documents, so what? we are busy reforming our country. in 2002 and became president of russia, -- in 2000 putin became president of russia, and he became conscious of what history was told and how it was being told, and this trickle-down. he became more wary about what archives were opened and who had access to information. they are not totally closed, and you can still work in them. some of them become difficult, particularly the military
boomers 15 years away from retiring and i don't have the luxury of the soviet union falling. the recipes that worked in the late 1990's worked. they don't work now. we have a different set of problems. host: from new york city, democrat blind, go ahead. caller: thank you for taking my call. even if we go over the fiscal cliff, we need a bigger plan because it does not even balance the budget. i don't think we really have a supply-side problem. they talk about cutting taxes on the right and i think there are so many people out of work and i think you need to get these people to work. i just think we have a demand issue, not a supply issue. if you're out of work, you cannot pay taxes. guest: he is exactly right -- no one is talking about a fiscal cliff that will solve the problem. there is no grand bargain being discussed except in the most general outline terms. there is enough to be -- nothing close to being politically acceptable. we're only talking of something of that will allow people to get through this. in the short term, we need to have fiscal policy that may get the deficit highe
demonstrate to them and also some opposition from within, because it is a unionized, heavily unionized labor force, and almost all of the labour force are attorneys. is subject to strike fear in your heart, a union of lawyers, but i could point to other places in my experience. we never talk about productivity issues because of the pressure from unions and the fear -- they were just as guilty as this, taking the money away. in the beginning it is often more expensive, and you achieve savings over the long term, but if you take them out in the beginning, you have almost assured yourself of failure in terms of your ability to deliver citizen needs, etc. >> this is going to give me the opportunity to tie back to a comment i made earlier about resources, the of efficiency by which you deliver results and the value to the mission as our results, because there is a little bit of light in that example. we were able 0 look at where our opportunity was for more efficiency but we had available, which is taking a fledgling electronic filing approach and turning it into an electronic pipeline and busine
the european union when we are discussing a banking union, it is to this house that represents our task appears that we should account. i bear that in mind when i am negotiating. >> can the prime minister confirm the statement reveals the government is now borrowing 212 billion pounds more than it previously planned to? >> i would take this with her plans were not to borrow even more. he was desperately disappointed it was predicted orlin would come down this year. that is a fact. >> the prime minister has rightly said we are locked in a global economic race. does he share my concern that having the highest aviation taxes in the world makes it harder for a business to compete and he increases the cost of living? let me ask the treasury to conduct a full review of whether it costs more than it brings in. >> i understand the point. we do not have any plans to commission a further response at this point. despite the challenges, we have limited the rise to inflation over the time of 2011 to 2012. they have only increased. i bear in mind what he says. >> can the prime minister confirm it will be pub
the difficulties of the union's task. the knot apprehend the vast extent of the rebellion -- they did not apprehend the vast extent of the rebellion, as he put it. >> the second year of the civil war and a strained federal government and weak union forces. coln's "n drehle on linkedin rise to greatness." this weekend on c-span 2. >> "tubes" author andrew blum joined just on "the communicators." >> i tried to make our virtual world as tangible as possible. i found out one of the major maps of the internet i was looking at, it was called tele geography. it was made in milwaukee. they watch this thing come off a giant schoolbus machine. it seem like a great way into the store of figuring out not only were the internet is, but also trying to come to terms with what is still physical about our virtual world. it turned out that one thing that is physical are the very large printing presses and large printing presses that rent ma pt maps of the internet. i followed a mapmaker there to see this map of the internet come off of the press. >> is there a center of the universe when it comes to the internet? >>
, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did they get to right to march into eastern europe? >> they were the victors of the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> the fine stalinism. >> stalinism was developed system,-- define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any k
now, the president and inspector general of amtrak and the united transportation union testified before congress. they discussed recovering $20 million in overpayments and the company's restructuring plan. from the house transportation and infrastructure committee. this is about two hours. >> good morning. i would like to call this hearing of the house transportation infrastructure committee to order. >> we are pleased to conduct this full committee oversight hearing on amtrak and today -- the title of today's hearing is getting back on track, a review of amtrak's structural reorganization. so welcome and we'll have -- we have one panel of witnesses today. and the order of business will be that i will start with an opening statement, provide some background, and will yield to mr. cummings this morning, and other members who wish to be heard, then we'll turn to our witnesses. we'll hear from all of them and then go to questions. pleased to welcome, again, everyone this morning. now, this is one of a number, we have actually held fourth in a series of full committee oversight heari
for banks and credit unions across the country. i know that mr. luetkemeyer share misconcerns that federal agencies have piled on more regulations without assessing the current regulatory regime to remove outdated, unnecessary, and overly burdensome regulations. last year, members of our house financial services committee urged the treasury secretary to make good on a promise from the summer of 2010 to take care as the dodd-frank act was implemented to ensure that federal agencies conducted a thorough assessment of the current regulatory structure to truly modernize and streamline the federal code. we wanted to make sure this opportunity was not missed. although secretary geithner claims streamlining is a priority, we've seen little progress on this front. but h.r. 5817 provides an example of how both sides can come together and i would like to thank mr. sherman for his work on this as well, have come together to remove outdated requirements. under current law, financial institutions are required to provide annual privacy is notices that the explain their practices. they are required to ma
to the fiscal cliff and what it could mean for federal employees. unions are pushing hard to preserve federal jobs in the fiscal cliff deal. more about that would jacqueline simon. later, you thought the election of 2012 was over. not yet. the electoral college is meeting at noon today to make another step forward in the process of getting the president into his second term. we will hear more from the american university professor james thurber. we will leave you with more comments from president obama last night in newtown, connecticut, at the interfaith prayer vigil. [video clip] >> we gather here in memory of 20 beautiful children and six remarkable adults. they lost their lives in a school that could of been any school, in a quiet town full of good and decent people. it could be any town in america. here in newtown, i have come to offer the love and prayers of the nation. i am very mindful that mere words cannot match the depth of your sorrow, nor can they heal your wounded hearts. i can only hope it helps for you to know that you are not alone in your grief, that our world too has been t
, in the course of just seven days, what has happened in michigan is a blow to crush unions, crush collective bargaining, and to crush the power of individual workers to stand together, pool their resources, so that they can support public policy workers, in other words, politicians, so that they could support those politicians who support their interests. it's been working that way for almost 75 years, during that time we went from a nation where so many people were in poverty, lived in poverty, had no benefits, made slave wages, worked 20 hours a day. went from that kind of situation into where most workers were -- had attained middle class status, where workers could afford to go out, buy the house, buy the two cars, send the kids to college and take a vacation. and have nice clothes and all of the things that middle class people want. that's what the union movement produced for america by leveling -- by being in a strong position to be able to demand fairness and equity from the employer. so the employers, let's say general motors, ford, chrysler, the automobile manufacturers, since we're
strong the coalition is. you have the american civil liberties union. you get people from across the political spectrum in people that might otherwise be suing each other. there is apple. microsoft. at&t. but in the large companies are behind this. i think it has a lot of energy behind it. the bill coming out of committee is good, strong, bipartisan support and will strengthen the effort. i agree that there needs to be more discussion of this legislation. there needs to be hearings early next year. i think we have a good starting point. >> konrad motyka, how often in your job do you use the e-mails surges are cell phone searches -- searches or the cell phone searches? >> i am primarily in narcotics. i've not made the use of that as a tool in that particular arina. i do not want to put myself out there that uses it all the time. by could address what was said earlier. more concerns were brought to the debate fairly late. there is a bipartisan consensus to take a look at this and address it. i hope some of the law enforcement concerns will be taken into account. it does seem that t
responds by saying -- host: this news from "the wall street journal." "unions deliver a blow." with a look at what is happening in michigan, thousands of union supporters turned out on the steps of the capitol to protest right to work measures. the measure passed. taking a look at the front page of "the detroit free press," "the law that is not over." "unions will not go down without a fight. recall efforts and legal challenges are possible." there you can see a union representative struggling with michigan state police yesterday over right to work legislation. here is the story -- host: "the washington post" has a map of right to work law states. "the wall street journal" take a look -- takes a look at which states are the most union heavy. the biggest ones are new york, alaska, hawaii, and washington. michigan comes right in behind washington. which is why "the wall street journal" goes with the headline that this is a blow in a particularly union dominated state. looking at some other news, this one out of the south, for "the new york times," "the gop control in north carolina, with a r
% of the residents in michigan live in a family that is associated with a labor union. instead, they focus on taking away women's rights, standing for the most extreme lmentses of the tea party that got rejected in this last election. my point is this, huge opportunities for democratic governors in those states to point out and make sure that we have governors who are focused on balanced budgets and creating jobs not standing in the way of women rights, minority rights, and all the other areas of social radical right politics that is defined if republican party an republican governors in general. >> let me ask about california. do you expect the governor to seek re-election in 2014? secondly in pennsylvania you are challenged to a republican governor and pennsylvania has a long tradition to have republican governors serve two-full terms. >> i think both california and pennsylvania are great opportunities for us. obviously the governor in california is doing a great job in california. he is making tough decisions i was impressed that he was able to win the referendum that that gave californians a cho
the national relations board and the unions that tried to take boeing down. he has shown it with his fiscal representation and the fact that he knows the value of a dollar. he understands what every family and small business goes through, and he has stayed consistent to that. it also shows you the fact that this man loves south carolina, and he is very aware that what he does and every vote he makes affects south carolina and affects our country. so it was with that that i knew that he was the right person. i have no doubt that he will fly now 2014. i am strongly convinced that i and the entire state understands that this is the right u.s. senator for our state and for our country. what i will also tell you -- and it is very important to me as a minority female -- that congressman scott earned this seat. he earned this seat for the person that he is. he earned this seat for the results he has shown. he earned this seat for what i know he's going to do in making south carolina and making our country proud. and so with that, i would like to introduce to you our senate-elect tim scott. >> than
a book, a new approach to industrial economics where they have no unions. everybody is responsible for their own work. they do peace work. everybody's responsible. everybody has a lifetime job. they get huge pieces of the pie. and ownership is -- the people, the workers, everybody owns the piece of the pie. host: what does this have to do with the fiscal cliff? caller: well, if more -- if more people -- if more industries would go to that, they wouldn't fall off the cliff. everybody would go to work. host: mr. rosenberg? guest: so i haven't heard of that but it sounds like a great place to be and live. i would have to get the name of that again. host: next up is don on the washington redskins. -- "washington journal." caller: i've been on social security for several years now. it's my understanding that the amount of money that you pay in through the payroll tax affects the amount of social security that you receive and it looks to me like people are under the illusion that this 2% is a good deal but at the same time, why they're going to be shortening themselves when they retire.
marriage means only a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife, and the words bouse refers only to a person of the opposite sex who is a husband or wife. one of looking at a state militia and the other looking at a federal issue, two cases, and a decision expected by june. if you want to wait and, the numbers are on your screen. -- if you want to weigh in, the numbers are on your screen. tweets.also send us tweak this is from "the washington post." the phone lines will remain on your screen. out of georgia on the democrat line. good morning. >> thank you it. i would like to say, i do not believe the in gay marriage. but i believe everyone should have the right to practice their religion and love how the 12. these right-wingers -- there are a lot of democrats that did not believe in gay marriage, but we do not believe we should be able to stop anyone from mary in who they want. this is like the caliban. you have these right-wing groups. the right-wingers would be the taliban. there are a lot of things they do not want. this is how they believe it. in the end, got is t
where they have no unions. everybody is responsible for their own work. they do peace work. everybody's responsible. everybody has a lifetime job. they get huge pieces of the pie. and ownership is -- the people, the workers, everybody owns the piece of the pie. host: what does this have to do with the fiscal cliff? caller: well, if more -- if more people -- if more industries would go to that, they wouldn't fall off the cliff. everybody would go to work. host: mr. rosenberg? guest: so i haven't heard of that but it sounds like a great place to be and live. i would have to get the name of that again. host: next up is don on the washington redskins. -- "washington journal." caller: i've been on social security for several years now. it's my understanding that the amount of money that you pay in through the payroll tax affects the amount of social security that you receive and it looks to me like people are under the illusion that this 2% is a good deal but at the same time, why they're going to be shortening themselves when they retire. is that right? guest: so that's a good question. i
the other 22 languages of the european union. it struck me how amazing this. i'm sure millions of iranians are rushing to the west side of the european union to read the guidelines of human rights which clearly are having a great impact on their lives. one of the problems we are confronting -- it is a real problem -- you clearly both alluded to it -- we are confronted with a huge dilemma. we want to stop iran from having nuclear weapons and there is a widespread belief among policy makers that if you pursue a policy of support for democracy promotion inside iran at the same time, the regime will move away from negotiations. if we have to choose between depriving the regime of nuclear weapons or depriving the regime of its power inside the country, it is easier to achieve the former rather than the latter and it's better over all -- that we can live with an authoritarian iran without nuclear weapons and when we try to pursue a free iran, we might end up with an inimical nuclear-arms authoritarian iran. it is an understandable dilemma but it doesn't serve our purposes very well and we have n
, which i won't refer to as right to work legislation, it's more appropriately named crush the union legislation. i came up last night to the floor to speak on that issue, and as i am prone to do, i use a lot of analogies. so last night i used an analogy that some find offensive, and i certainly was not meaning to be offensive or use a derogatory term. you know, everybody knows what the n word is. . the n word, mr. speaker, is used to describe a group of people and the n word used to be fashionable or it used to be socially acceptable to use the n word, but now we don't say the n word, we say -- we refer to that word as the n word. i had never heard of the m word, representative schakowsky, the m word. it's a word also that describes a group of people and it at one time has been commonly used as a desipive -- descripive term. it was at one time socially -- scripive term. it was at one time socially acceptable. but to my discovery, just within the last 12 hours or so, i have found that the use of the -- the use of the m word is no longer socially acceptable. now, the m word he refers
the government of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and impotion sanctions and urging the president to provide information about hezbollah to the european allies of the united states and support the government of bulgaria in investigating the july 18, 2012, terrorist attack on burgas. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from florida, ms. ros-lehtinen, and the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, will each control 20 minutes. the gentleman from florida is recognized. ms. ros-lehtinen: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to rhett re-their remarks and to insert extraneous materials into the record on this measure. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for such time as she wishes -- wishes to consume. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of house resolution 834 introduced by my good friend and colleague from pennsylvania, mr.
-guest worker, there are labor unions that are not in favor of a guest worker program and will have a debate about these things. this is is going to take a while and no magic solution to this. but we have to do it and important to do it and i believe we can do it. >> last question on this, four years from now, what is the likelihood that congress has passed, the president has signed some pathway to citizenship for current illegals? >> it is 50-50 and i hope i'm not being overly optimistic. i hope portions of immigration reform can be dealt with quicker than others but my hope is we have dealt with that issue and moved on. >> i brought along an old friend, from 2006 when you are a florida official, 100 innovative ideas for florida's future. one of the promises you said we should make to people is life without the -- you said that you favored life without exception for sexual presented dators. one of the issues you talked about is human trafficking, sexual exploittation of children. why has the united states been so slow to act? >> hard to believe we have a domestic problem. human slavery we a
faced down the soviet union and had 500,000 combat troops in the field? the sequester isn't stepping off a cliff. it is taking one step back from the cliff. now, the tax increases, however, are a very different matter. without intervention, the federal tax burden will balloon 1% at the stroke of -- 21% at the stroke of midnight on new year's eve, taking $2,000 to $3,000 from an averaged family. the house passed legislation to protect our nation from such a calamity but mr. obama vowed to veto it and the senate killed it. . instead mr. he obama tells us he'll veto any plan that stops taxes going up on all those very wealthy folks making over $200,000, who he says need to pay their fair share. i suppose fairness is in the eyes of the beholder. the top 1% earned 17% of all income but pays 37% of all income taxes. but that's beside the point. the fine point of it is that a lot of these very wealthy folks making over $200,000 aren't very wealthy, and they aren't even folks. they are 1.3 million struggling small businesses filing under subchapter s. our small businesses produce 2/3 of the new
classmate, we came here, we couldn't even find our way to the credit union. we were so terrified. but together we came and lynn has brought an exceptional voice to families and to women. so often women heading up those families. and she spoke through the prism of her own experience, which is the most powerful story that anyone can ever tell. no one could ever say to lynn woolsey, you don't know what you're talking about. because they knew that she lived it, that she had experienced it and she came here to change so many women's lives, the lives of families, in terms of education for women and girls, for stronger family benefits. i could go on and on. and she brought great voice and vision to the unfortunate policy , the march to folly, when we invaded iraq. she came to this floor over 100 times to speak against that invasion and we are all -- we are all in her debt for her conscience, for her integrity, for her wonderful voice, for her friendship and for the -- her love of the environment of the coast of california. which if there is ever the magical touch of almighty god, you se
in kentucky. one reason the labor costs have become more competitive is because the unions have become more flexible with a two-tier scale of pay. host: when you say flexible, are you saying weaker? guest: it would be fair to say weaker. the unions proactively agreed to have a two-tiered structure where in the past there was a nickname -- a derogatory nickname for her rigid the unions were, which was prabhakaran -- part of the problem. they have now a two-tier pay scale and the lower right wage is much lower than what the standard was before. that increases the competitiveness of a u.s. factory, but it does depress wages. there is no question that we can -- the weakening of a union bargaining power has driven average wages for u.s. workers down. but that becomes a complex question. it may lead to more jobs coming back because one of the reasons we were having trouble competing before was because of unfair labor costs. host: let's go to dave for marlborough, new jersey, on the republican line. caller: good morning. i wanted to tell you that i did not get a chance to read the article, but as
is propose this legislation through the taft harley act, anti-union, anti-labor act. that was his first legislation. he supports a federal aid to education. he supports a number of liberal issues. there are more conservative -- conservative issues he has voted for. does that answer your question? [laughter] >> if you look at his total record, i can go on forever. it is scattered throughout the book. the obama chapter -- everybody said obama grew and changed. no he did not. >> any other questions? thank you president so much for joining us. -- both so much for joining us. [applause] >> >>, south carolina governor and the key kelly announcing her replacement for senator jim demint's speech, followed by the senator's speech on the floor. and then a senator kay bailey hutchinson delivers her farewell address. tomorrow on "washington journal," will talk about the fiscal cliff with stand colander and joshua gordon. by the authorsed of the new e book from politico, glen fresh and jonathan martin. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c- span. >> as president obama begins hi
union, what i referred to as a global surplus for cycling mechanism. and we should all agree. but the united states said, no, mate. dollar surpluses, you cannot have any. none of you have any. you are all covered in ashes. the only accredited nation on the surface of the planet is the united states of america. i agree we have surpluses. we will recycle precisely the way that we choose and we are not going to start this recycling mechanism into a kind of united nations. it is indeed the case that from 1949 until 1960 onwards, the united states of america recycle 70% of its surpluses to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small part of it. i will not bore you with details. but it was not an act of philanthropy. when they go to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of t
these states are smaller states, more rural states. states in which public employee unions have less leverage in the politics which makes a big difference. and i think where the infrastructure needs are nowhere near as great as they are in the states that have central cities which require massive public transportation. mechanisms. the fact that those analogies aren't there doesn't diminish in any way the quite prudent and proper steps that these states have taken to keep their own fiscal house in order. certainly having rainy day funds which many of the big northern states haven't had is absolutely critical to take care of the enormous variations that occur in budgets, in the economy. i think you can't lose sight of the fact that one of the reasons you have smaller medicaid expenditure is because of the federal formula. which favors some states because it isn't based on the actual need. it's based on a median income calculation. and as a result of that, a state like new york or california has a lot more poor people. and it also has a lot of rich people. it doesn't get the same break. i think
people to join unions and economies move and want to be a part of what is happening. when you get more parents choices of education, it tells all children, low-income children, we see it all over the country. we can prove it with research prepare. when states have the right for their own energy, the revenues that come into the government help build better roads, better schools, and keep taxes lower. that is an opportunity i hope we can have in south carolina. this could be more efficient and do much better than we can do under the federal area. the principles of freedom are working. we need to spot like them, a showcase them, communicate them so people see that these ideas work. at the same time, they're going to be able to look to washington and see that the ideas that emplace are dragging us down. when washington hits a wall, the friends of freedom in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready not with political ideas of american ideas, ideas we now are working that we can show they're working for 100% of americans. that is what i am going to be doing for the next
. democrats and the labor unions are bankrupting this state. if the democratic party is so good, then why are we bankrupt? don't you think it's time the unions, instead of spending billions of dollars on political campaigns give that money back to the membership so they can maybe pay their own wages and tax bears and people like me that live on fixed incomes don't have to be taxed out of our homes and lose the money we have worked hard to make? guest: you have worked hard. number one, i cannot comment on the california situation. i just don't know enough about it. reports are that things are starting to turn around a little over there. it's tough to pass a budget if when you have the fiscal majority requirement. second, how we got here, it's not unions. wages for americans have been going down the past 115 years. people are not keeping up with inflation. the average american worker has taken a 2011 pay cut when you compare what they made 10 years ago to what they're making now. -- $2000 pay cut. on the spending, i disagree with you. the republicans in congress in particular have opened up
motivating factors are my core values learned within the catholic church and unions and actually reading the constitution, they are very similar. and i find myself looking at them -- looking at our representatives regarding their voting records and actions in regard to, say, equity in education and access to health care and fiar pay. and i actually have to say i link the fairness and focus on just this in regard to domestic issues and international issues. i do not apply those values just to u.s. citizens but to apply the same desires for fairness and justice with regard to our foreign policy, u.s. foreign- policy. i do find that my religious upbringing does -- is interwoven in however prison as. host: rich from tennessee. independent caller. caller: merry christmas, greta. host: good morning, merry christmas. caller: i echo the last caller. i would say my politics changed from republican to it independent. i voted the constitution party the last presidential election. but i found that most people who are serious voters do consider moral beliefs, our laws are based on morality. whether t
firsthand what it was like to live under the domination of the soviet union. they understand the significance of this particular proposal and these particular dinds of -- kinds of bills. i would like at this time to recognize the retiring chairman of the rules committee who has done -- soon-to-be retiring chairman of the rules committee who has done so much in his tenure here, i would like to recognize him for 15 seconds, if he goes over that he may have as much time as he wishes to consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for 15 seconds. mr. dreier: i thank my friend for the 15 seconds, and i'll try not to exceed that. if i do i appreciate his generosity in yielding me such time as i might consume. mr. speaker, let me just say that i appreciate the fact that my friend said we should have a defense capability that is second to none. we should be pre-eminent in the world. i appreciate his statement that that needs to be done. i also appreciate the fact that he talks about the multifairous societal needs out there, ensuring we don't see thos
the freedom not to join a union. now, they didn't do that because it was politically expedient or that they thought it was a good idea, because it actually is probably going to get a lot of the politicians in hot water in michigan. but what they did is looked at 23 other states who had adopted the same idea and saw that they were attracting businesses and creating jobs, and these states without raising taxes had more revenue to build schools and roads and hospitals. it was just an idea that worked. it's not a political idea to give people the freedom not to join a union, it's an american idea and it's an idea that works. we can look around the country today and again, we make these things political and give them labels that are good or bad, depending on, i guess, which party you're in. but we know a number of states have been real innovative and creative with what they're doing in education. we see what they've done in florida to create more choices. in louisiana particularly. forced by hurricane katrina to start a new system, in effect, and they see that more choices and stude
bill to try to help us get rid of the soviet union as an enemy. even if you discount that, federal spending skyrocketed under the reagan administration. we can improve the education of kids in georgia and across this country by getting rid of the department of education, letting those dollars stay in the hands of our government there in georgia. improve the education of our kids but it is not by building a bigger department of education. i have been very critical of the bush administration as well as this administration. i am trying to find solutions to the problems so your kids and all the kids in this nation can have a great education. leader.ave thbe the world's i am trying to find some common sense solutions to these problems. host: david is on the phone on a line for democrats. good morning. caller: good morning. i would like to say rest in peace for those in sandy hook. i think there is too much time spent focusing on the problems and not on the solutions. i think if they had a gun buyback program or they are given incentives -- where they are given incentives. either way, yo
and humanitarian needs. we support the efforts of the interim government of mali and the african union, united nations, to prepare a military response in accordance with international law to address the threats of terrorist and extremists in northern mali. the threat of military force has contributed we think to a change in some of the northern groups as witnessed by the recent willingness of mnla and other members to renounce their efforts to establish an independent state in northern mali. the military concept propose and endorsed by the african union provides a foundation for planning a proposed military intervention in northern mali. however, several key questions must be answered to ensure that this response is well planned, well resourced, and appropriate. these issues include among other things the required force levels, the cost and funding needs, the logistical requirements, the operational timeliness, the protection of civilians, and ensuring that the proposed military action is adequately linked to a political strategy and an end state for military operations in the north. we have s
prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries that our welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employer's. -- employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republican line, from maine. caller: i thank unemployment is probably a good thing, but when you expanded too far, it put a really heavy burden on the employers. as one lady called in on the last segment, the state she was from is obviously much higher than made is, but when it gets to a point that your state system goes broke, they put fees on the employer, and they can
have built over the last four years. we convinced all 27 nations of the european union to stop importing iranian oil and all 20 major global importers of iranian oil -- including japan, india, china, and turkey -- to make significant cuts. iran today exports more than one million fewer barrels of crude each day than it did just last year. iran's currency is worth less than half of what it was last november. the pressure is real and it is growing. and let me add, we take pride in the coalition we have assembled, but no pleasure in the hardship that iran's choices have caused its own people to endure. we are making every effort to ensure that sanctions don't deprive iranians of food, medicines, and other humanitarian goods. i travel the world working to help people everywhere take part in the global economy, and we never lose sight of the fact that iranians deserve this no less than any other people. america's goal is to change the iranian leadership's calculus. we have worked with the p-5 plus 1 to put a credible offer on the table. if there is a viable diplomatic deal to be had
are billions of dollars in debt. democrats and the labor unions are bankrupting this state. so democrat parties are so good why are we bankrupt? don't you think it's time that the unions instead of spending billions of dollars on political campaigns, give that money back to the membership so they can pay their own way? and as taxpayers and people like me that live on a fixed income don't have to be taxed out of our homes and lose the money we work hard to make? host: mr. welch. guest: first of all you have worked hard and -- but a couple things. number one, i can't comment on the california situation. i just don't know enough about it. although the reports are things are starting to turn around a little bit there. and it's very tough to pass a budget when you've got that superis majority requirement. number two -- supermajority requirement. number two, how we got here, it's not unions. the wages for americans have been going down for the past 10, 15 years. people are not keeping up with inflation. the average american worker has taken about a $2,000 pay cut when you compare what they were makin
to lead us, by the state of the union address, please let out a plan of action to how we may address this scourged of gun violence in our community. it is not just in our inner cities. it is not just in the urban settings. it is not just in the suburbs. it is everywhere. we cannot the scape the scourged unless you lead us, mr. president. we call on all members of congress to encourage. the country is with you. lead us out of this shadow, out of the dark valley of the shadow of death. lead us. lead us even when the men fail us every time. we call on you, our god to comfort to the hearts of every mother and father who have lost their child in newton, connecticut today. comfort the hearts of the mothers who lost her son of in chicago today, who lost her doctor in philadelphia today, -- daughter in philadelphia today. in new orleans, alaska, missouri, alabama, all across this country. comfort our hearts and bring us out of this dark, dark place of sadness. give us courage that we may act. give us a wisdom that we may act together. give us peace, for use a blessed are the peacemakers, for
that the teachers overcharged us and that the unions break the bank of the state? they should think about what a teacher has to go through. the kid's mother, the news lately was saying that she was some kind of survivalist, thinking the economist -- that the economy would crash. she has a mentally disturbed son with guns in the house? what she thinking about? she obviously has a problem along with her son. someone should have come to earth, saying that we know where you are thinking about. look at the results. host: you live in new york city. what you think about mayor bloomberg and his opinion on the gun issue? caller code generally what mort zuckerman was talking about -- caller code generally put more zuckerman was talking about, how many times has he been caught at -- stopped and frisked on the street on his way to an important meeting? now they want to go through his pockets? he thinks that stop and frisk is ok? i will take my chances with the people in my community rather than a police organization pulling me over and the time they feel like it. host of this, and comes to us from faceboo
? all of those people saying that the teachers overcharged us and that the unions break the bank of the state? they should think about what a teacher has to go through. the kid's mother, the news lately was saying that she was some kind of survivalist, thinking the economist -- that the economy would crash. and that is why she had all these guns in the house. she has a mentally disturbed son with guns in the house? what is her choice? you know,what she thinking about? she obviously has a problem along with her son. someone should have come to earth, saying that we know where you are thinking about. look at the results. host: you live in new york city. what you think about mayor bloomberg and his opinion on the gun issue? caller code generally what mort zuckerman was talking about -- caller code generally put more zuckerman was talking about, how many times has he been caught at -- stopped and frisked on the street on his way to an important meeting? now they want to go through his pockets? he thinks that stop and frisk is ok? i will take my chances with the people in my community
it was admitted to the union. but senator inouye's tradition of service began long before he came to the united states senate . he was just a boy when he heard the war planes over oahu, saw the bombs drop on pearl harbor, and ran to give aid to the wounded. he was still a teen when he volunteered to serve this nation overseas even though his people have been declared enemy aliens. and i'm reminded looking at secretary norm mineta here who served in one of those internment camps. senator inouye became a member of the famed 442nd reg mental combat team, the most highly decorated unit in the history of the united states military. that says it all. after being gravely wounded in italy, senator inouye's arm was amputated. he spent 21 months recuperating from his wounds in an army hospital in michigan. there he met a lifetime friend, future majority leader bob dole, another young g.i. who had been also wounded in the european theater. senator dole told senator inouye he planned to go to law school and eventually serve in congress. dan inouye was elected to congress in 1959 as hawaii's first congressm
to join unions. your economy grows and companies move and want to be a part of what's happening here. when you give parents more choices of education, it helps all children, low-income children, minority children. we see it all over the country and we can prove it with real research. when states have the right to develop their own energy, like we've seen in north dakota and pennsylvania, the revenues that come into the government help to build better roads, better schools, and keep taxes lower. that's an opportunity i hope we can have in south carolina. and when states can control more of their transportation and infrastructure dollars that can be more efficient and do much better than we are or what we can do now under the federal regime, so the principles of freedom are working all over the country. we need to spotlight them, showcase them, communicate them all over the country, so that people see that these ideas work and at the same time, they're going to be able to look to washington over the next few years and see that the ideas that are in place are not working. they're dragging us
of they choose to do that, they find only one in five consumer's request a copy of their credit union report in at any given year. last year 8 million consumers disputed items enter their credit report challenging the accuracy and enter one way or the other, even though each american who is in the credit system, as most americans are, they each have their credit reports, one for each one of the bureaus. on one credit report, an error can affect that consumer's ability to access credit. a former colleague of mine recently contacted my office. his wife had passed away earlier this year. when he applied for a mortgage was denied because one of his credit reports listed him as deceased. when he called the bureau to tell them he was still alive, he was told the error would take 30 days to correct. that is a long time if you are in the midst of a financial transaction. he got in touch with us and we fixed the problem for him. he still does not know what other credit reports say. unfortunately, that is just one story, but there are all too common. an investigative series into one of the largest new
union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get in line with everybody else. with respect, i disagree with what you just said. the religious right, which i obviously am not a member, rose after the religious left in the form of the reverend martin luther king and jesse jackson, etc., etc. the re
strongly urging the european union to designate them as a terrorist organization. the response that we got was unacceptable, in the sense that it laid out a whole series of bureaucratic reasons or hurdles that would have to be surmounted to do that. i do not think it should be acceptable to us, ever. in the coming days, i and senator lieberman and senator rich will introduce code resolution with the same message that we sent to catherine ashjian -- a resolution with the same message that we sent to catherine ashton. bashar al-assad is a key link. efforts to support moderate forces opposing him within syria should be considered now and considered seriously. i have recently called for a more robust u.s. response to the crisis in syria. i believe that a political transition to a government that reflects the will of the syrian people is also in the core security interest of united states and the region. moreover, this change would align with our values of supporting the democratic process and the basic rights and freedom that should be enjoyed by all people, regardless of religion, ethnicity,
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